Announcements Feed

'Nerd History' Storybundle, featuring Irregularity

IrregularityDelighted to announce that Irregularity is part of this month's 'Nerd History' Storybundle, sitting alongside some rather fascinating works of computing non-fiction.*

Storybundles are fun. You pay what you want. The books are DRM free. You get a ton of reading. And a big ol' cut goes to an awesome charity - in this case, the Computer History Museum. For those counting down the days until Jurassic goes extinct, it is also a nice way to pick up Irregularity before it disappears into the ether. (Or aether, take your pick.)

Irregularity contains over a dozen stories of the Age of Reason - featuring the ambitious men and women who tried to categorise and organise the world. And all the things that defied such organisation...

It contains stories by E.J. Swift**, Kim Curran***, Claire North, Nick Harkaway, Simon Guerrier, Rose Biggin, James Smythe, Henrietta Rose-Innes, Richard de Nooy, Roger Luckhurst, M. Suddain, Archie Black, Tiffani Angus and Adam Roberts.**** Plus some gorgeously irregular art from Gary Northfield, and an afterword from our partners at the National Maritime Museum. 

Tis a pretty good book, if I say so myself. And now's a chance to get it with six of its friends!

----

*Disclaimer: As compelling as time-travelling Bryan May and mechanical dinosaurs might be, Irregularity is not actually non-fiction. Unless you want it to be, in which case, go for it.

**This one was longlisted for the Sunday Times EFG Short Story Prize.

***This one got Tiptree Honors.

****This one was described as 'the most Adam Roberts thing that Adam Roberts has ever Adam Robertsed'. Which is pretty accurate.


Announcing... The Extinction Event

The End[via Jurassic London]

This October is Jurassic London's 5th anniversary, and we're celebrating with a huge new anthology.

The Extinction Event currently clocks in at over 150,000 words; over half of which will be completely new material. We've been taking this as an opportunity to revisit our previous publications - including the more rare and out of print titles - and also commission some terrific new stories.

I suppose the clue is in the name, but... The Extinction Event is also Jurassic London's last book. 

The Extinction Event will be published in late October, as a very glamorous limited edition. In fact, this will be the only edition - no ebook! - so we're going to make it as special as possible. 

It has been an incredible five year run and we've had a blast. We'll do the various "thank you" and "goodbye" bits in October, and we'll wait and talk about it then. But for now: you're all awesome! This is not a sad thing! 

For now... start clearing some shelf space. The Extinction Event is coming, and it is going to be big

Links and updates:

"ACK! I'm a Jurassic London reader and/or writer. What does this mean?!" 

Table of Contents - and a bit of art! - revealed at Tor.com.

r/fantasy will be hosting an AMA for contributors on 13 October

For updates on pre-orders and the launch party, join the Jurassic London mailing list.


The Ides of March!

6a00d8345295c269e201b8d06e2a24970c-600wi

Our annual excuse to share Rose Biggin's wonderful "Put to Silence" - a story about a story about a murder within a murder:

The director told me the aim was for Brutus, he told me Brutus deserved it, and he gave me a figure and a cash advance. He told me who was in on it: Julius Caesar, Cassius the Conspirator - and now me. They wanted somebody strong and reliable in the chorus, because they weren’t all as accustomed to the act as I was. They were all committed to the job, don’t get me wrong, he said; but until you’ve truly gone through with it, you don’t know for sure.

Read the whole story here.


Daniel Polansky and Howard Hardiman's The Builders

Barley by Howard Hardiman

[via Jurassic London]

 The special edition of The Builders, written by Daniel Polansky and illustrated by Howard Hardiman, is now available for pre-order. 

This hardcover edition is limited to 75 copies, signed by both author and artist. It comes complete with coloured endpapers, ribbon bookmark and 14 original black and white illustrations. 

 You can order your copy here.

More details here.


(Our) Year in Review

I always wind up writing 3,000+ word versions of these posts, and then delete them: there are few things on the internet more annoying than bloggering (verb. 'to blog about blogging, at the expense of saying anything remotely interesting'). Rather than bore you with sixteen pages of cod philosophising and blithering self-aggrandisement: bullets!

Executive summary

  • This is the year we went from 'a couple of people yelling into the void' to 'a dozen people yelling into the void'
  • By the numbers, our most successful year ever. And growing.
  • We published 260ish articles from a dozen regular contributors and a horde of guests. That includes 175+ reviews of books, comics, films, radio plays, games and stuff.
  • Thank you, thank you, thank you. Being read feels awesome.

Continue reading "(Our) Year in Review" »


The Indisputable, Irrefutable, Wholly Objective Best of 2015 List(s)

Img_24311

Tis the season for listicles!

And we didn't want to miss out on the fun, so we asked our contributors... friends... family... strangers... slow-moving housepets... for their 2015 favourites. As you'll see, the results aren't only indisputable and irrefutable, but also exhaustive. If something happened in 2015 and it isn't on one of these lists, it didn't happen.

There are even more lists coming over the next week, because we're lazy super-excited about sharing lists.

Continue reading "The Indisputable, Irrefutable, Wholly Objective Best of 2015 List(s)" »


Announcing... Aleriel, A Voyage to Other Worlds by W.S. Lach-Szryma and Molly Tanzer

AlerielOur erratic and extremely particular publishing wing, Jurassic London, has a new (or very old) title on the horizon: Aleriel, A Voyage to Other Worlds.

First published in 1883, Aleriel is one of the early classics of science fiction. The titular hero explores the Solar System - from his homeworld of Venus to the 'inchoate horrors of Saturn', with lengthy stops to visit a Utopian society on Mars and, of course, Earth. Notable for the way the novel incorporated the latest scientific, political and religious thinking, Aleriel is also the first work of fiction to use the words 'Martian' or 'Venusian' to describe the residents of these planets.

This new edition of Aleriel contains the author's original prefaces and end-notes to the first and second editions, and comes with a lengthy introduction from the Richard Dunn (Head of Science and Technology, Royal Museums Greenwich) and Marek Kukula (Public Astronomer, Royal Observatory Greenwich), discussing the role our celestial neighbours - especially Mars - have played in inspiring contemporary fiction. 

As a further bonus, Vermilion and The Pleasure Merchant's (and Pornokitsch's) Molly Tanzer has written a brand new sequel to Aleriel, "Civilisation and Its Discontented", which investigates the repercussions of Aleriel's visit to Mars.

The cover is by Jonathan Edwards, whose distinctive style can be found in the Guardian, Q and NME, as well as adorning album covers by, amongst others, The Black Eyed Peas.

Aleriel is out 24 November. Ebooks can be ordered now via Amazon and Amazon.co.uk. And the paperback is available here.